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Power Drill Buying Guide

Power Drill Buying Guide

Power Drill Buying Guide

A power drill is an essential home improvement tool. They can bore holes, loosen or tighten screws and even chisel away materials. Most drills have multiple functions, so even if you need a tool that could be used for different tasks, we can help narrow down your search to ensure you choose the correct one. Meteor’s guide explains everything you need to know about drills and will help point you in the right direction.

Drill drivers

Driver drill

If you’re looking for a versatile option that will cope with all the small jobs in your home, drill drivers and impact drivers is what your looking for. These drills not only drill holes into materials, they also act as drivers – this means they can loosen and tighten screws.
Using different drill and screwdriver bits means that you can use these drills on different materials (such as wood, metal or masonry) as well as use it to do other tasks like put up shelves or assemble flat pack furniture.

Combi drills

combi drill

Almost identical to the drill driver, the combi drill has an additional feature that makes them ideal for drilling into harder materials - behind the rotating drill bit two ribbed, metal discs click in and out against each other, pounding the drill bit forward. This functionality makes the versatile combi drill an excellent choice for your home. It effectively makes it two tools in one and means you don't have to buy each separately.
Some of our combi drills have brushless technology. This means that the motor has been constructed in such a way that it means your tool can be more compact, less heat will be generated, and it will be more durable.

SDS Drills

sds drill

Also known as the rotary hammer drill, an SDS (Self Direct System) drill is ideal for drilling through masonry and concrete. They have a hammer function that beats the drill bit as it rotates, helping them move through the denser materials. Additionally, you can separate out the rotation from this hammer function, allowing you to simply drill through lighter materials. Or you can turn off the rotation and use a chisel bit to help chip away at your brick or concrete walls – this is helpful if you need to create a channel in a wall to hide wires or cables

Hammer drills

hammer drill

Very similar to the SDS drill, hammer drills (also known as percussion drills) are really powerful drills that works by delivering a rapid succession of blows especially designed for drilling in masonry or rock. The key difference between a hammer drill and a SDS drill is that hammer drills do not allow you to use the hammering action without rotation – so they cannot be used for chiselling.

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